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theu.s.economyinthefourthquarte of. the u.s. economy in the fourth quarter of last year october, november, december contracted by 0. 1%. one-tenth of 1%. it was the first contraction in three years and it rattles financial markets. much of the slippage in gross domestic product, was due to what the u.s. federal reserves describes as quote weather related disruptions and other transitory facts unquote. the central bank is keeping monetary policy on hold. and says n worth of long-term securities a month, until there is a substantial improvement in the outlook for the labor market. also, the cut back in department of defense outlays, is likely to fuel concerns about the size of a slow down and the full economic fallout of the large quote unquote sequester cuts scheduled for a month from now, the start of march. the president's press secretary said this about the sequester. quote, across-the-board cuts to education, to research and development, would have repeat, would have, damaging effects on our economy and our long-term economic prospects. unquote. a growing number of analysts b
economy and, brother, it is so grim. u.s. economy unexpectedly shrinking in the fourth quarter. the biggest dip in 3 years. instead of jumping into high gear to figure out what to do to reverse this economic bad news some, top democrats used their time to play the blame game. they say it's all the republicans' fault. >> the economy shrunk. >> last three months of last year, our economy shrunk. >> the new report suggests that this economy still has not really fully recovered from the financial crisis four years ago. >> it was the democrats are saying? this is the best-looking contraction that there has ever been. >> it's disheartening, although we have moved at least temporarily beyond flirtation with default, to see republican leaders say, visequester in my back pocket. it's not a game. it's the american economy. >> you remember what this administration's growth forecasts were? for the next three to four years? their growth forecasts were anywhere between 3 and 4/2 percent. we are not growing. >> have you heard of a poor man spending himself into prosperity? >> it's just sad to
that to you shortly. now, the latest news about our economy and it is so grim. shrinking in the fourth quarter. biggest dip in three years. instead of jumping into high gear to figure out what to do to reverse the economic bad news, top democrats use their time to play the blame game. they say it's all the republicans' fault. >> the economy shrunk. last three months our economy shrunk. >> new report suggests that the economy still has not really fully recovered from the financial crisis four years ago. >> now the democrats, this is the best looking contraction it has ever been in this country. >> it's beyond the flirtation with default to see republican leaders say, i got sequester in my back pocket -- this is not a game. >> you remember what the administration's growth forecast were for the next three to four years. it was anywhere between 3-4 1/2%. >> have you heard poor men spending themselves into prosperity. it's dumb. >> there is more work to do in our economy and facing a major headwinds. that is republicans in congress. >> if there were republican in white house we would never come out
economy, keep jobs at home, how can you be sure you do the right thing. to sort through it all is todd marks. todd, great to have you on the show. thank you so much for being with us. >> oh, my pleasure, gerri. gerri: how do you know? they label these things every which way. how do you know which products are made in america? >> well, they are very serious and very complex, arcane rules governing what it means to be made in america. there's claims called qualified, made in the usa, no ambiguity. there's qualified claims, made in the u.s. of parts made in china. they are created here. gerri: hey, todd, like apple, created in california, asemilled in china. >> that confusion prompts people to scratch their head. we get letters all the time. how can it be? the laws are clear, but they are not. well, they may state that, you know, when they create laws about what it mean to be made in america, it says, in order to say it's unqualified made in america, there can be no ambiguity, and you don't want to mislead a reasonable person. you can't plant that idea. the companies do it with symbols, s
on. one at a time. is it possible to raise taxes and grow the economy simultaneously? >> absolutely. i don't think that's the best model, i think the economy can grow in spite of that. >> you have art he said that we need to put the taxes on the back burner? >> absolutely. the one we will finish this later. we will have you guys back again soon. thank you all for watching this show. we will have you back soon. t bul you hear what we found out about made in america. also, markets hit new highs. what's driving the latest run? can it last? your smart fun about to shame you in public. tonight, we have the apps that keep you in line and on time. "the willis report" is on the case. gerri: "the willis report" is on the case more on those stories in a moment, but, first, when you buy made in america, how do you really know it's made in america? labeling laws are confusing, and some products, well, they just outright lie about where it's made. if you want a healthy economy, keep jobs at home, how can you be sure you do the right hing. to sort through it all is todd marks. todd, great to have
are off 80, pushing us. let's go back to the economy. president obama and harry reid wants to tax the rich more. more revenue, they say. that means higher taxes. saying his policies will cause the economy to grow. this year. joining us from nashville. art laffer. what you say, if we raise taxes more this year, are we going to grow the economy stronger? >> we can do something, if we broaden the tax base dramatically and lower rates, we can really get the economy growing, but i don't think that is what he is talking about. he is just talking about rubbing the base. stuart: you take money away from a certain group of people and spread it around to the others. >> i don't think we need more taxes, stuart. and by the way, the point harry reid makes, which is correct as far as the senate goes, they were elected to the senate and obama was reelected, but so was the house numbers. the house numbers were elected on their policies as well, 235 republicans, they were not elected to increase spending and push higher tax rates is and they control the house. so using this political argument is a fault, i
programs. a lot of these visa programs, especially when the economy's doing really well and there's a lot of jobs available in the country, they fill up pretty quickly. visas for high-skill immigrants , the tech really wants that, wants more of those. you also have the h-2-b visas for foreign workers kind of for nonagricultural seasonal businesses. and you also have the h-2-a visa program which is mostly for agricultural workers. all these visa programs either have an arbitrary cap or are not being used that widely. basically that what businesses is want is they want to adjust these programs to the market so they can kind of rise and fall with demand. >> we thank you for your time today. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> if you go to most american hivetry textbooks i would also make you a bet, if you go back to the textbooks you had in high high school, you can take me up on my bet, but my bet with you is that in your american history textbooks in high school, if you go to the index, you will find no mention
] charles: hold on, hold on. one at a time. is it possible to raise taxes and grow the economy simultaneously? >> absolutely. i don't think that's the best model, i think the economy can grow in spite of that. >> you have art he said that we need to put the taxes on the back burner? >> absolutely. the one we will finish this later. we will have you guys back agai. david: friday numbers will be critical. melissa francis is next. melissa: i'm melissa francis and here's what's "money" tonight. what did boeing's management know and when did they know it? a new report says boeing was aware of the dreamliner's battery problems all along. so why wasn't anything done? we have a top former air safety official to weigh in on that one. >>> plus gdp growth comes to a screeching hot happen. major reason is because government spending plunged 15%. isn't that a good thing? trying to bring you a silver lining. the power panel talks about. >>> they are helping to soften the blow for its employees. maybe something to suggest to your boss tomorrow. the company's ceo joins us exclusively with the
, there is no such thing as recovery in sight, we have no economy policy, we have no energy policy, fuel is back up. i mean, people wonder why consumer confidence and confidence from the business owners is down? and the president pulls a you know deal like this, come on. this guy campaigned on jobs and the economy, he gave an inaugural speech on what? immigration, constructing royds and more liberal rhetoric, you know what, this is a step to socialist ladder forget rid of small business then we can control the big guys, i am frustrated and angry. tom: i hear it. marco, you have seep the president, i get up in the morning i think about jobs, i go on bet at night i think about jobs, do you think he has forgotten? >> i don't think he nearly forgotten about it, i think he doesn't know how to create jobs. it is the smalln 'n small busins that create them, if you have not run a business how in the world do you know how to create jobs this is why the count was important and should have been important. >> thank you very much. push to help illegals is on, but nobody is talking about how the cost will add up, we he
of an economy. rich: if any of the amendments pass, the bill then heads back to the house. the senate will very likely said this bill to the president's desk this evening. the sequester beginning in march in a large portion of government authority running out march 7. if they fail to reach a spending puma we will have another government shutdown. back to you. connell: let's bring in band manager. -- let's bring in dan and. the president is a bully. is that what that means? >> clearly, john boehner is now understanding that what is going on is he is in the thunder dome. rather than in a good-faith negotiation with the president. i am so glad, dagen, in your introduction $450 at least twice. $450 billion is incomprehensible. the democrats are arguing that the to spend this money because they feel that with the economy weak public spending will lift the economy. every dime spent will raise the economy a dollar $0.50. the republicans are arguing that rather than say spend -- let's talk about this the questionnaire. rather than spend that $69 billion, let's take it and put that 69 billion back in th
to essentially double fuel economy up to 54.5 miles per gallon. it does it in a way that collaborates with the automakers themselves in a way that will produce the kind of cars that are safe and effective and performed the way americans consume or want to see and will really provide tremendous societal benefits. so what is a win for everyone and that is my basic message. if you look at it on the climate change site, what we're talking about is over the course of 2012 through 2025, vehicles will reduce carbon pollution by 6 billion metric tons. were talking about 12 and arrows of oil saved. these are numbers not to be sneezed at, ladies and gentlemen. these are very large benefits for society. we saw automakers standing up, touting this initiative because they knew they could produce cars are more efficient and consumers who want to purchase. on the consumer side, perhaps consumers here are the biggest winners of all. they're going to get cars that perform the way they want better safe, that is, provide them utility they need, but they're going to save money in their pocketbooks every
'm christine romans and this is "your money." ali velshi is off this week. the economy looks like it's ready to take off, 157,000 new jobs added in january. the unemployment rate rising slightly to 7.9% from 7.8%. there's room for improvement. but it continues a trend. now 28 months strong. a trend of more jobs added every month. stocks are soaring with the s&p 500 a good example of what americans are holding in their 401st and i.r.a.s crossing the 1,500 threshold since 2008. and housing that helped fuel that recession, it looks like it's making a comeback. 2012 was the best year in real estate for five years. home prices jumped 5.5% year over year in november. that's the biggest in six years. with interest rates on six-year lows, you can get 3.5% on a 30-year fixed mortgage. home price should continue to go up. it's not all positive. gross domestic product shrank for the first time in three years coming down ever so slightly by 0.1% in the fourth quarter of 2012. with stocks and housing looking up, why should gdp come down? blame it on washington. showdowns on capitol hill over fiscal cliff
a car that is safe while also trying to meet these fuel economy standards? any comments on that? >> yeah, i guess i will jump in. yeah, so safety is first party for all auto manufacturers. there is a tension between, particularly in terms of weight, adding weight to vehicles for various safety features, not only regulations demand but also the consumers want and demand. and the weight is a very important factor in trying to improve fuel economy of the vehicles. i think fundamentally from toyotas of you, you can do both. you can have efficiency, lower carbon and safe vehicles. i think the key is the pace at which these two issues are progressed, with respect to one another. so, you know, having a mid \50{l1}s{l0}\'50{l1}s{l0} fuel economy car in 2025 communism is there a long enough time to think that we can engineer vehicles, including the safety future that will be acquired in a way that these vehicles will be safe or for people to drive? i think it comes down to balancing sort of the timing with which we are doing these things. to make sure the fuel economy reductions if you'll don't g
continue to help the economy. >> reporter: the main reason for optimism: those positive revisions to november and december jobs data. it turns out, the government underestimated how many positions were added by 127,000. it was that miscount that helped push the dow over 14,000 for the first time in more than five years. and, at 14,000 the blue-chip index is about 150 to 200 points away from its all-time high. market pros like wayne kaufman predict new highs for stocks in coming weeks. >> many investors, retail investors, individual investors are reaching the point of recognition where they no longer believe the economy is going to collapse again, or that the stock market is going to collapse again. >> reporter: surely, an improving job market will keep investors jazzed about stocks. to that end, economists expect employers to continue adding about 150,000 jobs a month this year and the unemployment rate to inch lower. >> i think by the end of the year we're probably going to be looking at unemployment rate of 7.5% to 7.4%. certainly not low enough to make the federal reserve happy
the economy as it did claiming it was fixed and then finding excuses and scapegoats when its premature announcements turn out to be false, i would suspect the economy is doing better than it is today. >> austin is a key member and today a professor of economics at the university of chicago booth coolal school of business. in fairness, this white house spends a lot of time blaming republicans for economic problems. has it gone overboard? perhaps too much politics and not enough policy because we did have an election. >> you know, i thought that was kind of a weird, cheap shot to come from the minority leader. i think the difference between being recovered and being in recovery is pretty different. and that is we're growing at a modest pace. we should be growing faster, but we're about the fastest growth of the advance world. but we still have a long way to go before we're back to where we were prebubble days and prerecession. i think the job's numbers, they were okay. you know, they were about what was expected. we saw over the last year, we've added a little more than 2 million jobs. t
sure the software economy of 9/11 did not jeopardize her ability to create jobs and opportunities for americans at home. tax rates coming down. people should understand the entrepreneurial spirit of america needs to have a predictable tax policy and weight that do not burden the road. right now we have tax rate discussions that ur economy and that's not good. liz: it's hard to understand. the average hard-working american doesn't always understand what is happening. basically presidt george w. bush got vilified for raising the. despite the fact that on his watch the berlin wall fell, the soviet union collapsed or it at the same time, this president that we have a thing that saying that i will not raise taxes on the middle class family. i won't even raise capital gains taxes. how are we, in this day and age, when president barack obama does not get criticized? >> people should look at what the first president bush did when he did have new taxes. it cost him reelection, but he did the right thing. he got something. he he got disciplined into the federal government. he drove discipli
of time will essential double fuel economy up to 54.5 miles per gallon. it does it in a way that collaborates with the automakers themselves in a way that will produce the kind of cars that are safe and effective and perform the way that american consumers want to see. will really provide tremendous benefit. so it's a win for everyone and that i think is my basic message. if you look at on the climate change side, whether we're we ae talking about is over the course of 2012-2025, those vehicles are going to reduce their carbon pollution by 6 billion metric tons. we're talking about 12 billion barrels of oil saved. these are numbers that are not to be sneezed at, ladies and gentlemen. these are very large benefits to society. in terms of automakers can we saw the automakers standing up for the president. we saw them touting this initiative because they knew they could be producing cars that were more efficient and that consumers would want to purchase. and on the consumer side, perhaps consumers here are the biggest winners of all. they are going to get cars that again perfor
economy really slumping? and how stupid is it for the president to dissolve his jobs council, which by the way was nothing more than business window dressing anyway. at least today congress did pass a debt ceiling extension so we won't go bankrupt immediately. joining me now, cnbc chief international correspondent michelle caruso cabrera and laffer. i want to ask you about this whole business. government spending on defense really collapsed and helped bring down yesterday's gdp. >> yes, it did. >> so all the liberals are saying see, we told you so, if you cut spending, you're going to ruin the economy. do you believe that? >> no, not at all. government spending is taxation. milton always said it. the government redistributes resources. you can see it really clearly. two-person world, farmer a and farmer b, if farmer b gets unemployment benefits, who do you think pays for them, farmer a? you know, government spending is taxation. the reason we have the great recession is because of the government spending, not in spite of it. >> follow-up. it would be bullish for economic growth. >>
in a period where we're concerned, well, how did he do that? the economy grew a lot. maybe more than 3% sometimes. unemployment was below 5% the budget was balanced due to his own parsimony. how did i manage to make the budget go lower? how did that help the economy? a lot pause he got the government out of the way of the economy. >> amity shlaes tracings the life of the 30th president of the united states, in coolidge on c-span's q&a. >> wisconsin governor scott walker delivered his state of the state address in madison recently where he called on state lawmakers to put forward, a quote, environmentally sound mining bill. he also pushed for a income tax cult for the middle class and job creation. the governor said he was doubling down on his efforts to meet his 2010 campaign promise to create 250,000 private sector jobs over the years. this is about half an hour. [applause] >> at this time, at this time it is my privilege to introduce our friend, the governor of the state of wisconsin, scott walker. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you. [applause] thank you. thank
, we are growing, not fast enough. i mean the economy is doing all right. and, you know, the question is going to be now what does congress and president do together. melissa: simon, we're not growing. it is negative. that is the point of the segment. we're not growing. >> i understand. the thing is the economy is doing all right. it is not doing really bad. it is not doing really great. somewhere in the middling place it has been last couple years. that didn't substantially change. as you heard from the other guests. the key thing what is congress and the president going to do? how do we balance need for more growth with also deficit reduction in the next few months. that is where the big battle will be in washington i think. >> let me answer that question. melissa: go ahead. >> i think it is a good one. this is the big political battle, this is one of the reasons i think that the huge fiscal stimulus we had in 2009 was such a expensive mistake because what we did essentially we overloaded the economy with all of this deluge of government spending and essentially what we've done now
. we still have a risk to the economy. i don't see us heading off to a robust, fast recovery. i think 2013 will be better than 2012. i wish i could tell you that it would be really good because that's what we need. >> i don't call myself an economist. i specialize in economic policy. i try to be a good consumer of other forecasts. one thing i learned from that is frankly i don't trust any macro forecast that goes beyond six months. i don't think -- they are just guessing beyond that. i think we probably -- at least i would have similar reactions. i am still concerned about the risks posed by europe. i'm still quite concerned about the risks from things heating up in the middle east. the u.s. economy is repairing itself. we don't have at significant housing drag that we did a year or two ago. balance sheets are repairing. yes, things seem to be heading in the right direction. but i also think that people often make the mistake of confusing the level for the growth rate. i think we need to understand that even if the economy grows at 2% or 3% this year which seems to be the optimistic b
annual by march 1st, we need to do something smaller in the name of staving off damage to the economy, to consumer, and to federal workers. here's the president. >> if congress can't act immediately on a bigger package, about they can't get a bigger package done by the time the sequester is scheduled fto go into effect, then i believe they should at least pass a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reforms that would delay the economically damaging effects of the sequester for a few more months until congress finds a way to replace these cuts with a smarter solution. >> now, of course the fundamental barriers separating the two sides on either a short term or long term deal is that president says it needs to be balanced as he calls it including both spending cuts and tax increases through closing loopholes. republicans say it has to be only intending cuts. and unlike the fiscal cliff where the president had the advantage, this is one where republicans have that advantage. if nothing happens, all the sequester cuts take effect although it was designed that neither party likes them.
had a lot of smart people who work with us here in chattanooga, and, of course, as the economy went bad, that was a downer for everyone, and then the stimulus money came along. we, fortunately, had already completed a very comprehensive business plan that showed that the system would work, and it would pay for itself over time with the savings that can be achieved from the new technology. melissa: yeah, they were giving away good money after bad for, you know, whatever project was going, so you might as well grab it and spend it on good if they spend it no matter what. geek move, awards $11,250 for moving into the city, $10,000 for expenses, and 12,000 for moving. how many show an interest in the opportunity? >> we've had a hundred applications and we'll filter through them. it is a success based on a similar success a few years ago with artists, encouraging people to move here for a specific purpose, and we have neighborhoods where houses are going wadding. geeks, that's a good term in chattanooga, urban pioneers frequently, so with a little incentive, we can bring individuals to c
in washington are giving us what is good for the economy and that is a on a diet while the private sector continues to grow and when you compare us to the last expansion there were 150,000 private sector jobs added herman in the last expansion and in this expansion there are 200,000. believe it or not washington may be helping us. dagen: if times are so great, why is the ten year treasury below 2% on a yield? why hasn't the bond bear market showed up yet? which you were calling for last march? >> you are right. i got to tell you it has probably more to do with the craziness of central bankers than anything else? i was just in davos last weekend we spent a lot of time talking about the monetary policy, what is going on, how unorthodox this all is. the thing that i said to mark carney of the head of the bank of england was waived lb into uncharted waters and acknowledging we don't know how to get home we decided to sell deeper into uncharted waters. we are setting ourselves up for major problems. the fact that the fed continues to keep interest rates this low especially when i can point to
in the technology industry where it was mentioned that between 2010 2010-2020, the american economy will annually create more than 120,000 additional computer or science jobs that were require at least a bachelors degree. that's just mention one aspect of this. this is great news for many of our computer science students. and for joy that is the end of the good news. each year only about 40,000 american students receive bachelor degrees in computer science. in other words, there are approximately 80,000 new computer science positions every year in the united states cannot be filled by available american workforce positions. and i have positions that need to be filled so that our technology industry can continue to thrive. simply put, u.s. based companies have a great need for those trained in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. but at least right now there are not enough americans trained and ready to fill these jobs. we cannot continue to simply hope that american companies do not move operations to countries where they have greater access for individuals trained in these s.t.e
at the same time. >> how can they get ahead when they do not have the economy and the jobs and the opportunities. >> it is utterly wrong. >> i think this is her rent this. >> it is an honor for me to help out my mother. >> everyone just piles into one house because nobody can afford their own things. stuart: any last comments on the sandwich generation? >> it was like we were in the 40s and 50s. stuart: our time is up. dagen and connell, it is yours. dagen: thank you, stuart. i am dagen mcdowell. connell: i am connell mcshane. the economy when it negative. private-sector job growth offering some hope for the road ahead. connell: you only see this on the fox business network. elizabeth macdonald ringing exclusive video showing us how hospitals are putting money before patients. dagen: research in motion rolling out the blackberry ten. a band-aid for a gaping head wound. connell: i love name changes. dagen: let's go to nicole petallides at the stock exchange. good morning. nicole: let's talk about the markets. the dow is down about 14 points right now. we have had the dow not
. everything we do. there is nothing else that impact our economy so directly as energy. whether it is individuals that are struggling to fill up their gas tanks, pay their electric bills, whether it is business leaders making decisions on investments based on the cost of power server farms or smelters, we recognize lower cost is better and that's what everybody is seeking. there are those who would have you believe that the best way to reduce energy's direct cost is simply to raise the direct cost so that we discourage energy use. my friends, this is a self- defeating policy. lowering the direct cost of energy is key to helping the u.s. economy recover and prosper. absolutely keep. next is clean. as we attempt to minimize indirect costs by driving up these prices, i would suggest this is a policy that is doomed to economic and practical failure. instead, we have to be aware of the impacts of every type of energy and make rational, informed decisions on what is acceptable, what needs to be mitigated, how do we do just that? our challenge here is to reduce the cost of cleaner sour
if the numbers are so bad. >> there were signs that the economy is holding. particularly, when you look at the strength in the fourth quarter, for all the complaints, the economy is showing resilience in the face of the mess going on in washington. in a way, that is good news and i can be positive for stocks. there is nothing in this report that would suggest the fed will change anytime soon. we will continue to see more buying of treasury security, the liquidity will continue to benefit the equity markets. melissa: i was also surprised to see an upward revision for september and december. if you put together the upward revisions, it was an extra 127,000 jobs that we did not know about. >> the tricky thing about the gdp number, though, digging under the surface, it was quite strong. stronger in the fourth quarter than it has been since the beginning of 2012. i think the strong employment numbers and income numbers kind of fit together. melissa: michelle girard, thank you so much. appreciate it. have a good day. lori: ubs getting bearish on the bond market. a new investor classification
killing this economy. the first day back in session the senate voting on a bill that will increase spending by $60 billion, the house wasn't willing to pass an amendment that would offset by spending by strong revisions elsewhere. congress unwilling to pay for the spending and instead want to keep throwing money at a problem. liz: hurricane santa hit a part the u.s. the size of western europe. it was devastating. not all the money will go toward helping out these victims, a lot of it will go to other spending on other items. do you find that to be a problem? all sorts of other things loaded into it. >> less than 50% of the money is actually going to disaster relief for the victims of sandy. sending money to fisheries in alaska. work on the roof of the smithsonian institute. the power of naming things, pet project underneath piggybacking off of disaster and this is why we are 15 to $16 trillion in debt. until the american people hold folks in congress and the president accountable, this is going to continue. we have to get to the crux of the problem. the problem is the american peop
to bring down the debt. not just as a share of economy, but overall. you're right. it doesn't bring down the debt. at all. mr. speaker, that's the conflict that we face here as a people, as a country, not as republicans, not as democrats, but as a people. on the one hand, what our politicians are saying is we're going to use the money to pay down our debt. but what the reality is is that proposers are coming out today that never, ever, ever pay down a penny of debt. now, mr. speaker, if you want to see that for yourself, you can look. the president's budget each year is posted online, on the o.m.b. website. the first one he submitted, i hold the cover page here, was called a new era of responsibility. it was the first budget that the president ever submitted. but as i go through that budget, mr. speaker, what i see is projects -- proximates for 2020, for 20 -- projections for 2020, for 2030, for 2040, for 260 and for 2080 -- 20 of 6 -- 2060 and for 2080. you hear that, you have children. 2020, 2030, 2040, 2060 and 2080. and in each one of those years, according to the president's budget,
, family reuniting and the talk of a positive impact that immigration has on the economy were all well receive people acting in community together said that no one is looking for a free ride. >> i think earned citizenship, people are willing to pay fines for coming here. i -- families have said that to me personally. >> i talked with the pastor of our lady of guadelupe church, who was in the audience and he said that he thinks that immigration reform is imminent. i talked to the father this afternoon, and he said that the president was right to talk about the immigration in terms of the impact on business and the economy. i will share more with you coming up on nbc bay area news. >> chris, we will see you then. still ahead, against all odds, a soldier that survived losing four limbs on the battlefield, now this vet is using his experience to inspire others. >> also, this is a story that belongs to everyone. and it is so cool to be able to share this with everyone. >> a trip down memory lane ends with history being rewritten, what a woman found out about her family that could change the
the economy, they say, is starting to turn around. what is going on here? we will bring in the senior business correspondent and anchor of bulls & bears. thank you for joining us. this number, then, is increasing. in fact, two years ago, 42 percent of retirees were putting off retirement. why the increase? >> it has been -- we have been getting more gray as a workforce because people have longer life spans and they have better health. we have switched from defined pension benefits to more risky 401(k) plans for people who have worked longer. the last two years was a dramatic jump leaving us to think it is something to do with the economy. people have been drawing down the 401(k)'s and into their savings because they have lost jobs and the value of homes are going down. the storm now is back where it was before the big financial meltdown in 2008 but, however, there is a feeling of insecurity. that is what is driving people to stay in the workforce longer. >>heather: home prices are rising now, and you mention the stock which has turned around if now. so, with the economy possibly rebounding, ho
are going to talk about silicon valley and the bay area innovation to the economy today. as you look at the panel, talking about the silicon valley, we have the mayor of san francisco. it will come into perspective, that when you have a giant like ibm anchor here in the valley, you are seeing in between companies like google and apple and facebook with incredible growth. in san francisco, mayor lee has welcomed to the fold in twitter, zynga, companies that are into cloud computing, hiring lots of people that not only want to live and work in the valley but recognize san francisco as being part of the valley. we are, indeed, fortunate, from san jose to san francisco, to be part of the innovation economy. we are finally seeing once again california's innovation is leading us out of the last three years of recession. i do not know about you but i am pretty tired of the recession. i made a statement several years ago that it was about time for an adjustment to the economy, things were too expensive, overheated. two years after that, i regretted making that comment. it was great to hear j
the economy we have right now? >> i think you'd see more hiring and i think you'd see more spending. those are the key things that drive the economy. you mentioned the numbers today. here's a key potent of that number. average hourly earnings, basically how much people are making by hour, right, as they work. do you realize we're at a one and a half year high in average hourly earnings. guess what the number is. it's a little over 2%. nobody has i any money. taxes are going up and people are making really lousy wages. >> people talk about fixing the tax code. one of the big questions is where do you start? would income tax be where with u start or start with corporate taxes or something like that? >> you have a couple things going on. one thing that's huge is the amount of money that's overseas in these corporations, right. the repate ration tax is gigantic. that's why a lot of money is overseas in tax haven. get the money back to the united states so they'll hire and spend capital. that's how you get the economy to grow. >> do you think we see 15,000 this year? it's only the first month.
this economy actually do not justify this incredible run for this market. we're going to hear both sides coming up on "the closing bell." >> we will. plus a realtime check on clorox's company earnings. they're up br thnt and sitting at its all-time high right now. >>> let's check the markets for you. dow down about 99 points. off of the lows which were about 2:30 or so. 30 minutes ago on the industrial average. now back to 13,910. check the nasdaq composite where it's down about 37 points. and the s&p 500 looks like this with a decline on the session of just about 13 points. >> okay. so in today's selloff we're backing away from the all-time high on the dow set back in '07. we have danny hughes back with us from devine capital. michael holland as i live and breathe. >> blast from the past. >> mike shay from direct access on the floor with us. and our own rick santelli is in chicago. michael, i'm starting with you. you don't have sweaty palms with this selloff today? >> no. and i was saying with michael shay before we got down here, is i have friends who are short the market or out of the market
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